What Age Is Best To Teach Your Kids About Sex And Relationships?

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Disclaimer: Elise Ho, aka “Dr. Ho” is a Holistic Health & Life Coach. Dr. Ho is NOT a medical doctor, licensed therapist, lawyer, or a bevy of other things. Products or services that Dr. Ho believes in are the only ones that she recommends. Dr. Ho may receive compensation, product, or an affiliate commission on anything you see on this site. This is a personal Website solely reflecting Dr. Ho’s personal opinions. Statements on this site do not represent the views or policies of any organization with which I may be affiliated.

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What Age Is Best To Teach Your Kids About Sex And Relationships?

 

As kids begin to grow from a young age through to their teens, their bodies change, and hormones start to rage. Speaking about sex and relationships is not something that should wait.

Unfortunately, kids these days get exposed to sexual content on social media, school, and television. It is not a good idea to allow the internet or your child’s friends to teach them about sex as a parent. Try your best to educate them early about sex and relationships so they can be more informed as they grow into young adults. This article will discuss the best time to talk to your kids about sex and the difference in the methods of educating them.

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Younger kids (8 – 10)

 

This age group is a significant place to start talking about sex as it allows you to lay the foundation for what sex is about. Talking to kids in this age range might feel different from much older kids, but the basics surrounding sex and relationships can still be taught. Don’t shy away from questions asked about sex. 

 

You will be surprised how much your child knows about sex due to exposure to school information or info from friends. One way or the other, they might have been in a conversation relating to sex, and they might be bubbling with many questions. As a parent, do your best to answer any questions they might have. It’s best to get the answers from you rather than an outside source which may not be helpful. You should also try as much as possible to avoid the ”Do Not” approach when discussing sex with your kids. Instead, teach them the boundaries and what their body parts mean.

Older kids (11-19)

 

Kids in this age begin to transcend into the teens; they begin to experience a process known as adolescence. According to the World Health Organization, youth starts at ten and ends around 19 years old. Adolescence provides the opportunity for kids within that age group to begin developing physically to become adults; these periods also create strong urges, especially towards sexually related activities. During these periods of rising sexual desires, they need more attention, care, and education. Teaching children in this age group is relatively more straightforward since they are more mature. 

 

Start building a close relationship with them. Don’t just jump into the conversation about sex; they might shy away from the conversation. Know the right time and place to start such a conversation, and set positive expectations you desire to portray. If your kids are in a relationship, try not to discredit it but teach them the right ways of being in a relationship and addressing issues of sex when it pops up in the relationship. Lastly, let your kids know that you trust them always to make the right decision regarding sex. This will allow them to develop confidence and do the right thing when pressured to have sex.

Sex education is essential in the healthy upbringing of a child. Studies prove that kids who are given early sex education tend to stay away from sex until they are well of age to have it. Also, early sex education leads to lower cases of pregnancy and other sexually transmitted diseases. Parenting is always ongoing, so you can still have healthy discussions about safe sex with your grown children. Trust that even when they are old, feeble, and in long-term senior care, they will keep your advice.

Please use the comment section below to share your tips, questions, and/or thoughts about this post.

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Naturally Yours,
Elise Ho
Ph.D., D.N. Psych.
Behavioral & Mental Health Specialist

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20 thoughts on “What Age Is Best To Teach Your Kids About Sex And Relationships?”

  1. I think there is no specific age. As long as they are already mature enough and ready emotionally to be discussed with such topic, I think that’s the best time. Parents should be the one talking about it. They should exhibit support to their child.

    1. We definitely do not want to share information that they are not ready to hear. The sex-ed talks can start with something as simple as when it is ok to touch someone’s hand.

  2. Great topic and something we all need to prepare for. For many kids, keeping ongoing communication is the key so this stuff isn’t too weird to chat about.

  3. This is good information. I always think it depends on your kid too. My son was able to understand and ask questions at a younger age. My daughter who has Down Syndrome isn’t ready. She doesn’t understand what any of this means. It’s a bit concerning for us because she’s a teen. Thanks for sharing!

  4. As a mom-to-be, I am currently looking into all sorts of information about things to better my parenting. This was one thing I’ve been looking into so thank you for this article.

  5. Fortunately, you don’t live in a state like Texas where the state law prohibits sex education, even though it is desperately needed. Our only choice here is to talk one- on- one, which is another reason it is so important.

  6. Definitely, an informative post to read, and I agree that kids should understand things about this matter at an early age but still need to consider their age when sharing the information and make sure that they are ready to know things about it.

  7. This is such a great resource for any parent. These conversations can feel incredibly awkward, but they’re so important to have. This will help make them more natural and easier to navigate.

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About The Author

Dr. Elise Ho

Dr. Elise Ho

Dr. Elise Ho is a Holistic Health & Life Coach with a special interest in emotional health, life alignment, and energy flow.

Elise will partner with you to align your mindset, your energy, your home and your career so that you can live your life's desire with freedom and love.

Elise offers 30 years of experience and multiple certifications and degrees including a Ph.D. in Natural Health and a doctoral degree in Naturopathic Psychology.