Are you switched on to the connection between screen time & sleep?

screen time

Disclaimer: Elise Ho, aka “Dr. Ho” is a Holistic Health & Life Coach. Dr. Ho is NOT a medical doctor, licensed therapist, lawyer, or a bevy of other things. Products or services that Dr. Ho believes in are the only ones that she recommends. Dr. Ho may receive compensation, product, or an affiliate commission on anything you see on this site. This is a personal Website solely reflecting Dr. Ho’s personal opinions. Statements on this site do not represent the views or policies of any organization with which I may be affiliated.

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Are you switched on to the connection of screen time & sleep?

 

Screens in all their forms have advanced our lives immensely. This past year, especially, our phones have been our only forms of communication, and our televisions have been the closest we’ve come to traveling the world. But, let’s not forget that there is a darker side to today’s technology and, whether we notice it or not, many of us are feeling its effects.

 

While adults scramble to ensure their youngsters get no more than an hour or so of screen time each day, most of us are guilty of spending at least four times that on our computers, phones, and television over 24 hours. In fact, a 2020 study found that the average American adult spent an astounding eight hours each day consuming some form of digital content. Here, we’re going to look at some telling signs that you could benefit from taking note and switching off, at least some of the time moving forward. 

You experience eye strain.

 

‘Computer vision syndrome refers to strained eyes, blurry vision, or headaches caused by excessive screen time, and is experienced by nearly 60 million people globally. Long-term exposure to CVS can lead to permanent changes in eyesight, and if you think this has happened then you shouldn’t hesitate to seek professional assistance and glasses (preferably anti-glare,) from companies like eyeglasses.com. However, if you have yet to feel long-term implications, treatments are thankfully simple and include lowering the backlight on your screens or following the 20-20-20 rule for breaks. And, of course, reducing screen time where you can won’t hurt, either. 

You struggle to get to sleep

 

As can be seen from this article at huffpost.com, screen time is also often behind issues like insomnia. Blue light exposure close to bedtime is the most obvious example of this. Blue light can affect melatonin production and impacting wake/sleep cycles.

Even daytime screen usage can increase electrical activity in the brain that makes sleep harder to come by.

If you struggle to get to sleep, it should go without saying that you could benefit from removing screens from your evening routine. It’s also worth limiting daytime usage where you can, reducing stressful screen-time activities like social media scrolling, and again lowering your backlight to help your melatonin on the whole. 

 

You find it hard to socialize.

 

As parents, we often worry that too much screen time will impact our children’s ability to socialize while overlooking the fact that the majority of adult socialization happens through a screen. This is especially prevalent in modern workplaces, where it’s more common to email someone a few offices down than to have a face-to-face conversation. All of this can drastically impact our ability to communicate in person. In turn, affecting our understanding of eye language, conversational cohesion, and general social confidence.

So, before you admonish your kids for getting their screens out again, it’s time to ask yourself an important question. What is it? How is my own screen time looking today? 

How much screen time do you think is appropriate?

 

Please share your thoughts below.

Naturally Yours,
Elise Ho, Ph.D., D.N.Psy

Please use the comment section below to share your tips, questions, and/or thoughts about this post.

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screen time

 

Please use the comment section below to share your tips, questions, and/or thoughts about this post.

CLICK HERE to subscribe and never miss a thing.

Naturally Yours,
Elise Ho
Ph.D., D.N. Psych.
Behavioral & Mental Health Specialist

Inspired? Pin this to your Pinterest boards.

16 thoughts on “Are you switched on to the connection between screen time & sleep?”

  1. I must admit that there are times that all I do is tinker with my phone, and yes, it does give me eye strain and headaches. As much as we limit the little kids with their screen time, I think we adults should do the same.

  2. I am a work-from-home mom, and I need to be in front of my computer for more than 8 hours a day 6 days a week but I’ll make sure to rest my eyes after my work and during my rest days.

  3. I am far, far too connected to my screens. Everything I do for my career is directly connected to my computer and phone. I’ve had to give myself semi-regular business hours just to decompress and get off the screen!

    1. Great tip, Heather. You are giving yourself some time to shift and to get away from the blue light. Many studies show that blue light can cut your melatonin production in half. Melatonin is a key factor in the quantity and quality of sleep.

    1. Ah.. that is hard if you are needing to be on your computer and phone a great deal of the time but do not like it. You are working on setting healthy boundaries.

  4. I love this post. This is why I make sure I limit my kids’ screen time. I TRY to limit mine, but my entire business is online, and I’m the one in charge. LOL

    1. That definitely makes it challenging. It is also challenging when we also find this device is our main way of staying in touch with the people in our circle.

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About The Author

Dr. Elise Ho

Dr. Elise Ho

Dr. Elise Ho is a Holistic Health & Life Coach with a special interest in emotional health, life alignment, and energy flow.

Elise will partner with you to align your mindset, your energy, your home and your career so that you can live your life's desire with freedom and love.

Elise offers 30 years of experience and multiple certifications and degrees including a Ph.D. in Natural Health and a doctoral degree in Naturopathic Psychology.