Can An Adjustable Bed Really Help With Arthritis?

An Adjustable bed is designed to provide support to joints and pressure points. Arthritis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of joints.
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Can An Adjustable Bed Really Help With Arthritis?

An Adjustable bed provides support to joints and pressure points.

Arthritis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of joints.

One of the effective ways of alleviating arthritis pain is to use an adjustable bed.

Let’s review the top 5 promises made by manufacturers of adjustable beds.

First up is relief of pressure points.

The human body has several pressure points. Examples of such areas are the lower back, hip, and knees. Arthritis sufferers commonly complain of pain in these areas.

Adjustable beds are designed to relieve pressure points by cushioning the body from below.

Secondly, we see improved blood circulation.The Healthy Heart Lifestyle: Avoid Heart Disease

A healthy heart calls for following A Heart-Healthy Lifestyle. However, we often ignore the importance of sleeping correctly.

Ideally, it is recommended that the feet are elevated at 8-12 inches above the heart. This position helps to prevent blood accumulation in lower parts of the body. In turn, this helps to minimize joint pain and swelling.

The third benefit is the assistance to healing sore muscles.

Improved blood circulation and evenly distributed weight contribute towards healing sore muscles.  Additionally, many adjustable beds come with massage features.

Fourth is the fact that the beds can adjust according to your body.

The best feature is the ability to contour according to your specific body shape.  Additionally, you can make minor adjustments that can help to make two people more comfortable.

The fifth and final benefit is the even distribution of weight.

Distribute body weight evenly and as a result, minimize pressure point pain. Sleeping on a flat mattress leaves gaps between your body and the mattress. Adjustable beds aim to fill these gaps.

 

Now it is your turn:

Does this make you interested in buying an adjustable bed? Do you already have one?

Author Bio:

Seemab Sajid is a freelance journalist. She has a passion for writing on social issues and things that make a difference. Additionally, Seemab works for Rehab Report as a content marketing executive.

18 thoughts on “Can An Adjustable Bed Really Help With Arthritis?”

  1. I showed this article to one of my pickleball partner who is suffering from RH arthritis and she was wondering if this is as effective during winter ?!

  2. Kathleen - Bloggers Lifestyle

    There is a lot of interest in this post on adjustable beds, Elise. So we will FEATURE this post and others may also find help and information.
    Kathleen
    Blogger’s Pit Stop

  3. I’m having terrible pains in my neck and I just can’t get comfortable in bed so I’m only sleeping about 3 hours a night and then I wake up. My doctor suggested a special pillow but that made me even more uncomfortable. Part of the problem is that people want me to sleep on my back and I find it impossibly uncomfortable.

    I’m having physiotherapy and exercises but if that doesn’t work I may have to try the adjustable bed – however, that would be a huge expense if it didn’t work. Persevering with the physiotherapy for now.

    Joy Healey – Blogging After Dark

    1. I sure do hope that the physio works. I love my Bamboo pillow and found that it also helped alot. I am sorry to hear about the sleep. I have a wonderful natural supplement that I can recommend to help with that.

  4. Fascinating Elise. I do not have an adjustable bed, never thought about getting one until reading your article. I have arthritis in my hips but haven’t had a problem with it for years and you’ll probably laugh when I tell you why. When I first began learning the hula I almost quit as a result of the pain because of course so much of the dance is focused on hip movement. But I wanted so much to be accepted into halau that I pushed through it and after a couple of months the pain went away and I haven’t had a problem with it since. Even though I’m no longer in Hawaii I still practice, but if I ever stop I may find myself shopping for an adjustable bed. 🙂 Thanks!

  5. “Ideally, it is recommended that the feet are elevated at 8-12 inches above the heart.” – I find this fascinating in that no one I know sleeps like this. I am going to try it for a few nights and see how I do. The cold weather changes certainly brings about joint pain. Brr!

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About The Author

Dr. Elise Ho

Dr. Elise Ho

Dr. Ho is a Holistic Health & Life Coach with a special interest in Mindset, Stress Management, Emotional Health and the Brain-Gut Connection to it all.

During Elise's 30+ years of experience she has been honored to work closely with health and wellness pioneers such as Dr. Mark Hyman, Dr. Daniel Amen, Dr. John Gray, and several others.

Dr. Ho holds multiple certifications and degrees including a Ph.D. in Natural Health and a doctoral degree in Naturopathic Psychology.